NHL Salary Cap By Team

Why can a team be over the cap?
Team Proj
Cap Hit
Proj
Space
Current
Space
Dead
Space
Active
Roster
Retained
Left
Contracts Forwards Defense Goalies
$97,649,404$97.65M
$-14,149,404$-14.15M
$547,499$547K
- 26/23
50/50
72%
36%
12%
$93,769,295$93.77M
$-10,269,295$-10.27M
$32,082$32K
$1,906,250$1.91M 24/23
47/50
61%
44%
12%
$92,222,841$92.22M
$-8,722,841$-8.72M
$922,516$923K
- 24/23
53/50
70%
35%
13%
$90,952,605$90.95M
$-7,499,272$-7.50M
$2,857,590$2.86M
$637,500$638K 22/23
47/50
67%
32%
7%
$88,839,001$88.84M
$-5,339,001$-5.34M
$8,331,667$8.33M
$8,022,083$8.02M 23/23
46/50
61%
17%
15%
$86,570,015$86.57M
$-3,154,598$-3.15M
$81,667$82K
$996,667$997K 24/23
51/50
55%
39%
8%
$85,933,276$85.93M
$-2,433,276$-2.43M
$211,688$212K
$2,725,000$2.73M 22/23
46/50
64%
32%
4%
$85,791,687$85.79M
$-2,682,521$-2.68M
$7,891,664$7.89M
$7,645,000$7.65M 24/23
45/50
55%
29%
8%
$85,627,592$85.63M
$-2,478,425$-2.48M
$5,034,167$5.03M
$14,743,590$14.74M 24/23
50/50
49%
27%
9%
$85,412,307$85.41M
$-1,912,307$-1.91M
$1,207,500$1.21M
$4,833,333$4.83M 22/23
49/50
51%
38%
10%
$85,251,912$85.25M
$-1,751,912$-1.75M
$6,575,000$6.58M
$3,979,167$3.98M 20/23
48/50
56%
32%
8%
$85,160,714$85.16M
$-1,869,047$-1.87M
$7,870,001$7.87M
$7,520,833$7.52M 22/23
49/50
56%
26%
8%
$84,680,763$84.68M
$-1,180,763$-1.18M
$955,000$955K
$610,891$611K 23/23
48/50
64%
33%
8%
$84,545,244$84.55M
$-1,045,244$-1.05M
$981,571$982K
- 25/23
45/50
64%
31%
8%
$83,714,733$83.71M
$-430,983$-431K
$7,658,750$7.66M
$8,200,763$8.20M 23/23
49/50
53%
33%
7%
$83,567,763$83.57M
$39,566$40K
$39,566$40K
$4,804,167$4.80M 26/23
50/50
60%
26%
13%
$83,548,629$83.55M
$153,290$153K
$153,290$153K
$6,616,667$6.62M 26/23
49/50
59%
33%
4%
$83,456,100$83.46M
$259,875$260K
$259,875$260K
$372,829$373K 23/23
44/50
68%
27%
6%
$83,366,664$83.37M
$145,683$146K
$145,683$146K
$1,495,000$1.50M 22/23
48/50
54%
34%
8%
$83,272,084$83.27M
$559,918$560K
$559,918$560K
$4,164,167$4.16M 22/23
47/50
60%
27%
6%
$83,109,097$83.11M
$390,902$391K
$390,902$391K
$2,750,000$2.75M 29/23
50/50
59%
35%
10%
$82,992,949$82.99M
$507,050$507K
$507,050$507K
$1,487,500$1.49M 27/23
44/50
60%
37%
7%
$82,735,766$82.74M
$1,498,236$1.50M
$1,498,236$1.50M
$2,425,000$2.43M 27/23
47/50
62%
22%
11%
$82,363,514$82.36M
$1,327,393$1.33M
$1,327,393$1.33M
$4,729,910$4.73M 22/23
51/50
51%
31%
9%
$80,660,047$80.66M
$2,839,952$2.84M
$2,839,952$2.84M
$5,213,889$5.21M 22/23
46/50
54%
26%
9%
$79,877,871$79.88M
$3,622,128$3.62M
$3,622,128$3.62M
$10,307,500$10.31M 28/23
53/50
49%
23%
9%
$79,365,905$79.37M
$4,134,094$4.13M
$4,134,094$4.13M
$2,891,667$2.89M 23/23
48/50
44%
35%
8%
$78,106,062$78.11M
$5,393,937$5.39M
$5,393,937$5.39M
$1,853,334$1.85M 23/23
46/50
60%
18%
6%
$77,295,350$77.30M
$6,204,649$6.20M
$6,204,649$6.20M
$8,805,556$8.81M 24/23
50/50
44%
37%
8%
$75,019,130$75.02M
$8,480,869$8.48M
$8,480,869$8.48M
$200,000$200K 22/23
43/50
54%
28%
3%
$74,998,336$75.00M
$8,501,663$8.50M
$8,501,663$8.50M
$9,944,707$9.94M 24/23
48/50
41%
27%
6%
$74,674,602$74.67M
$8,825,397$8.83M
$8,825,397$8.83M
$4,712,500$4.71M 26/23
50/50
55%
19%
9%
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NHL News

Signings

Apr 20 2024 | Pittsburgh Penguins
Entry Level | 3 yrs
$2,775,000
Cap Hit
$925,000

Ben Hankinson | Octagon Athlete Representation

Apr 19 2024 | Colorado Avalanche
Entry Level | 3 yrs
$2,717,499
Cap Hit
$905,833
Apr 19 2024 | Toronto Maple Leafs
Entry Level | 2 yrs
$1,750,000
Cap Hit
$875,000

Peter Fish | Global Hockey Consultants

Apr 19 2024 | New York Islanders
Entry Level | 2 yrs
$1,735,000
Cap Hit
$867,500
Apr 19 2024 | New York Islanders
Entry Level | 2 yrs
$1,650,000
Cap Hit
$825,000
Apr 19 2024 | New York Islanders
Entry Level | 2 yrs
$1,647,500
Cap Hit
$823,750

Mark Gandler & Todd Diamond | International Sports Advisors Co., Inc.

Apr 18 2024 | Vancouver Canucks
Standard | 2 yrs
$2,000,000
Cap Hit
$1,000,000

Craig Oster | Newport Sports Management Inc.

All Signings

Trades

Mar 15 2024

The Ottawa Senators acquired Jamieson Rees from the Carolina Hurricanes for 2024 6th round pick

Mar 15 2024

The Ottawa Senators acquired Wyatt Bongiovanni from the Winnipeg Jets for future considerations

Mar 8 2024

The Vegas Golden Knights acquired Tomas Hertl, a 2025 3rd round pick, and 2027 3rd round pick from the San Jose Sharks for David Edstrom and 2025 1st round pick

All Trades

Transactions

Apr 21 2024 | Vancouver Canucks

Silovs was recalled from AHL Abbotsford under emergency conditions Sunday.

Apr 21 2024 | Boston Bruins

Bussi was assigned to AHL Providence on Sunday.

Apr 20 2024 | Boston Bruins

Bussi was summoned from AHL Providence on Saturday, according to the AHL's transaction list.

Apr 20 2024 | Toronto Maple Leafs

Jarnkrok (hand) was activated from long-term injured reserve Saturday, per the NHL media site.

Apr 20 2024 | New York Rangers

Domingue was recalled from AHL Hartford on Saturday.

Apr 20 2024 | New York Rangers

Edstrom was recalled from AHL Hartford on Saturday.

Apr 20 2024 | Colorado Avalanche

Holm was called up from AHL Colorado on Saturday.

All Transactions

Injuries

DAY-TO-DAY | Undisclosed |
Expected Return
Apr 22, 2024

Mattias Janmark | Janmark (undisclosed) didn't practice Saturday but still could be available to play Monday in Game 1 against the Los Angeles Kings, Daniel Nugent-Bowman of The Athletic reports.

DAY-TO-DAY | Undisclosed |
Expected Return
Apr 22, 2024

William Nylander | Nylander (undisclosed) won't play in Game 1 versus Boston on Saturday, per Elliotte Friedman of Sportsnet.

OUT | Lower Body |
Expected Return
May 5, 2024

Jonathan Drouin | Drouin (lower body) will miss Colorado's first-round series against the Winnipeg Jets.

DAY-TO-DAY | Undisclosed |
Expected Return
Sep 16, 2024

Kris Letang | Letang will get a second opinion to determine whether he'll need surgery to address his undisclosed injuries, Seth Rorabaugh of Tribune-Review Sports reports.

OUT | Undisclosed |
Expected Return
Sep 15, 2024

Ryan Johansen | Johansen (undisclosed) doesn't believe he's medically fit to play hockey, and GM Daniel Briere doesn't expect to get the 31-year-old forward back, Jon Bailey of Philly Hockey Now reports Friday.

DAY-TO-DAY | Illness |
Expected Return
Sep 16, 2024

Nikita Zaitsev | Zaitsev is questionable for Thursday's tilt against the Los Angeles Kings because of an illness, Ben Pope of the Chicago Sun-Times reports.

DAY-TO-DAY | Undisclosed |
Expected Return
Sep 16, 2024

Connor Murphy | Murphy (undisclosed) will miss the season finale against LA on Thursday because he tweaked something during Tuesday's 3-1 loss to Vegas, per Ben Pope of the Chicago Sun-Times.

All Injuries

Insights and Insiders

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What Is the NHL Salary Cap?

The NHL salary cap is the total amount that NHL teams may pay for players. The amount set as the salary cap each year depends on the league’s revenue for the previous season. As it is a 'hard cap,' there are no exemptions. However, if a player is injured and it's thought that they will miss at least 10 NHL games and 24 days in the season, their team can put them on long-term injured reserve (LTIR). By doing so, they can surpass the salary cap.

The salary cap was introduced to prevent teams with the most revenue signing all the top players, which was becoming a problem in the '90s and early 2000s. For instance, by signing a number of top-performing players and significantly spending more than the majority of other teams, the Detroit Red Wings were able to win three Stanley Cups in that time.

This led to the 2004-05 CBA negotiations, during which the entire season was cancelled — the first time a labor dispute has ever caused a cancellation in a major sports league in North America. At the time of the negotiations, teams were spending around 75 percent of their revenues on salaries — much higher than any other North American sports league. Eventually, they agreed to the general structure that remain today, including the mandatory payment to players in US dollars.

The concept of a salary cap is not new to the NHL. One was first introduced during the Great Depression, at which time the salary cap per team was $62,500 and $7,000 per player.

Salary Cap History

Since its reintroduction in the 2005-06 season, the NHL salary cap had risen every year until the pandemic shortened 2020-2021 season:

2005-2006$39.0 million
2006-2007$44.0 million
2007-2008$50.3 million
2008-2009$56.7 million
2009-2010$56.8 million
2010-2011$59.4 million
2011-2012$64.3 million
2012-2013$60.0 million *
2013-2014$64.3 million
2014-2015$69.0 million
2015-2016$71.4 million
2016-2017$73.0 million
2017-2018$75.0 million
2018-2019$79.5 million
2019-2020$81.5 million
2020-2021$81.5 million
2021-2022$81.5 million
2022-2023$82.5 million

* During the 2012-13 season, there was a lockout. The salary cap was set to $60 million, but NHL hockey teams were allowed to spend a pro-rated $70.2 million for the shortened season.

The salary floor (the minimum that a team must spend as a whole) is 85 percent of the salary midpoint. For the 2021-22 season, the cap floor is $60.2 million.

History of the Teams

Originally, there were just six NHL teams, called the Original Six. In the 1967-68 season, six new teams were added. The Original Six formed the East Division and the new six formed the West Division.

In 1974, six more NHL hockey teams joined the league, creating 18 in total. The league then took four teams from the World Hockey Association when it ceased to exist in 1979. With the Cleveland Barons gone in 1978, this brought the total to 21 teams.

There was no further expansion to the league until the '90s. The next new NHL team was the San Jose Sharks in 1991. Another eight were added in the subsequent decade to reach 30 teams by 2000. Finally, in 2016, Gary Bettman, the NHL commissioner, announced that another new NHL team — the Vegas Golden Knights — would join the List of NHL Teams, making 31 teams for the 2017-18 season.

Tune in to learn about developments in the league, your favorite NHL teams and players. PuckPedia brings you up to speed on the latest news and other exciting developments in the world of NHL hockey. Bookmark PuckPedia now!

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